Living Joyfully Is An Art

Living Joyfully Is An Art

Are you living joyfully everyday? The art of living joyfully is created through our daily choices and actions. LivingSingleLivingWell is about the Art of Single Living, and specifically, joyful living. Our courage allows us to manifest optimism and confidence. This emboldens us to seek greatness. We recreate our lives each day allowing joyful living to be within our reach. Millions of people are learning, or relearning, how to live a healthy, happy and purposeful single-life. Being single today may be your choice; it may be a decision that was made for you. The reality is that you and I, and millions of others are learning how to be single, date, build new relationships and heal the past. We all work to communicate better, find peace, and create healthy, happy, purposeful lives. Each of us is on an individual journey toward understanding self, personal growth and the dynamics of interpersonal relationships. It is my sincere hope that LivingSingleLivingWell is a springboard for thought and reflection.  LivingSingleLivingWell is an open, welcoming forum that may open the door to a deeper understanding of how we each choose to live an optimistic and happy single life. For at least today, you are single because you…

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PTSD Injury Not Disorder

PTSD Injury Not Disorder

PTSD should be categorized as a PTSD Injury, or PTSI. “Post-traumatic stress disorder” is a label given to a set of symptoms set forth in the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association 1994), the clinical manual treatment providers used to determine diagnoses. DSM-5 was revised in 2013 as an update to the 1994 edition, but in many experts’ opinions, the draft model which was surrounded by controversy, did not go far enough. During the drafting and debate process, even experts in the field were unable to agree on diagnosis, and what characteristics and symptoms will be considered diagnostic for the disorder, as well as the future name for PTSD. The name, PTSD, was created in 1980 as a new diagnosis, and further codified in DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association 1994. PTSD was used most often in reference to victims of combat, the term was “shell shock,” “battle fatigue” and “soldier’s heart.” Diagnoses in any medical specialty are important because they allow for standardization of diagnosis and treatment by the medical and mental health communities as well as reimbursement and payment by insurers. Having the PTSD diagnosis has helped millions of people in various ways: It gave…

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22 Veterans Lives Lost Each Day At Home

22 Veterans Lives Lost Each Day At Home

22 Veterans lives lost each day to self-inflicted wounds For those who have served, these are like brothers and sisters, regardless of how well, or even if you knew them. Clay Hunt, US Marine Corps Veteran and sniper, was one of the casualties of war who survived the battlefield, but lost his life to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and emotional trauma. This weekend, there are a series of memorial runs sponsored by Team Rubicon around the country to commemorate Clay Hunt’s life, bring awareness to the tremendous cost and keep the matter of Veteran care on the front burner. Through efforts of IAVA, the nonprofit organization representing veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan, and in a rare convergence of human decency and common sense, Congress has passed a bill and President Obama will sign it. H.R. 203, the Clay Hunt Suicide Prevention for American Veterans Act (Clay Hunt SAV Act), introduced by Rep. Timothy J. Waltz (D-MN), is named for a Marine Corps veteran and sniper who took his own life in 2011, after having served tours in both Iraq and Afghanistan. He was just one of the estimated 8,000 Veterans lives lost to self-inflicted wounds each year. This is the…

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The PTSD Workbook, 2nd Ed.

The PTSD Workbook, 2nd Ed.

The PTSD Workbook: Simple, Effective Techniques for Overcoming Traumatic Stress Symptoms (New Harbinger Self-Help Workbook) Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an extremely debilitating anxiety condition that can occur after exposure to a terrifying event or ordeal. Although many know that this mental health issue affects veterans of war, many may not know that it also affects victims of domestic violence, sexual violence, natural disasters, crime, car accidents and accidents in the workplace. No matter the cause of their illness, people with PTSD will often relive their traumatic experience in the form of flashbacks, memories, nightmares, and frightening thoughts. This is especially true when they are exposed to events or objects that remind them of their trauma. Left untreated, PTSD can lead to emotional numbness, insomnia, addiction, anxiety, depression, and even suicide. In The PTSD Workbook, Second Edition, psychologists and trauma experts Mary Beth Williams and Soili Poijula outline techniques and interventions used by PTSD experts from around the world to offer trauma survivors the most effective tools available to conquer their most distressing trauma-related symptoms, whether they are a veteran, a rape survivor, or a crime victim. Based in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), the book is extremely accessible and easy-to-use,…

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Post Traumatic Stress Injury (PTSI) Support Letter

Post Traumatic Stress Injury (PTSI) Support Letter

April 7, 2012 John M Oldham, MD President The American Psychiatric Association 1000 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1825 Arlington, VA 22209-3901 Dear Dr. Oldham: We write to you in support of the request from General (Ret) Peter Chiarelli that the American Psychiatric Association change the name Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) to Post Traumatic Stress Injury (PTSI) in its next edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. When he first made this request, General Chiarelli was Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Army. Now retired, General Chiarelli is CEO of the corporation, One Mind for Research. This request pertains only to the name, and expresses no opinion on the existing DSM-IV or proposed DSM-V criteria. General Chiarelli’s request springs from the culture of the U.S. Armed Forces, which finds the label “Disorder” to be stigmatizing, compared to the term “Injury,” which is not. General Chiarelli represents soldiers who suffer in silence. He has concluded that changing the name of PTSD to PTSI will reduce barriers to care, with palpable benefit to his service members, their families, and the nation. General Chiarelli comes forward as suicide rates of young veterans are on the rise, as media attention to invisible wounds of…

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